Being a Mom is Like Having 2.5 Full Time Jobs, Research Finds

No wonder we’re always tired.

 

Mom life is hard work. It’s like having a full-time job, right?

 
Well, not exactly. The reality is mothers actually put in way more time than the average job, according to recent research.

 

Any mom knows the work doesn’t stop when the kids get to school for the day. Whether you're at your “real” job, planning activities, scheduling appointments, shopping, cleaning up, doing laundry, or preparing food for your mini-army, you barely have a moment to breathe. You’re the last to go to bed and the first one up in the morning, and you don’t get to clock out for the day or take weekends off.

Not that we need special research to know we work our tails off non-stop, but in case anyone doubts us, here’s definitive proof.

Welch’s (the juice company) set out to shed light on real-life mom schedules by surveying 2,000 women in the U.S. who had kids aged 5 to 12. The results revealed this about the typical mom:

 

  • She starts her day at 6:23 a.m. and doesn't stop the grind until 8:31 p.m. (that’s a 14-hour shift).
  • She works 98 hours per week (career and family duties) - the equivalent of 2.5 full-time jobs.
  • She has about one hour to herself per day (maybe enough time for a lunch break, a shower, or a super-lucky cat nap).

 

Many also related that their lives were a never-ending series of tasks. Ain’t that the truth?!

 

Special Salute to New Moms

 

Let’s be honest here. This data represents best-case scenario with kids that are at school most of the day. Those with babies and toddlers endure constant demands all day and multiple wakeups per night, consequently working every hour under the sun - and moon.

Although this kid gig may be one of the most exhausting jobs, don’t forget it can also be the most rewarding, even if you're not getting paid in green (besides boogers and refused broccoli).

In the meantime, put on your Wonder Woman outfit (er, yoga pants) and keep on keeping on, Mom!

Mommy Must-Haves

 

Mothers were also asked how they did it all. Popular sanity savers included:

  • Coffee
  • Help from family or babysitters
  • An effective “angry voice”
  • Naps
  • Wet wipes
  • Healthy snacks
  • Toys
  • Tablets/iPads
  • Netflix
  • Drive-through meals
  • Yoga pants
  • Wine
 

 

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